hebrew
1)

Why does the Torah insert a 'Vav' in "v'Ayah"?

1.

Rashi and Ramban: The 'Vav' is superfluous. 1

2.

Rashbam: His name was "V'ayah". 2

3.

Refer to 36:24:153:1


1

As we find in other places (See Rashi and Ramban). .

2

The Rashbam actually writes that the latter's name too was "Va'anah", but there seems to be no reason to say this. Moreover, in this very same Pasuk the Torah refers to him as "Anah". (EC)

2)

Here it says that Anah was Tziv'on's son. Verse 20 says that Anah was his brother!

1.

Rashi: This is the same Anah mentioned above. Tziv'on fathered him through his own mother, therefore he is called his brother. 1

2.

Ramban: What the Pasuk means is that this is the Anah who discovered the mules... , and is not synonymous with the Anah mentioned earlier, who was his uncle. 2 And it was this Anah (ben Tziv'on) who was the father-in-law of Esav.

3.

Refer to 36:24:153:1


1

Refer to 36:2:3:1*

2

Moshav Zekenim (14) rejects this. The Vov "v'Eleh Bnei Anah" teaches that this is the same Anah mentioned above!

3)

What were the "Yeimim"? What is their significance?

1.

Rashi, Ramban and Targum Yonasan: "Yeimim" are mules, which Anah discovered by crossing a donkey with a female horse. 1 He was a Mamzer and he brought Pesulim (like himself) into the world.

2.

Ramban (citing Targum Onkelos), and Rashbam: He came across a group of strong men 2 or of wild animals, whom he defeated. 3


1

Ramban: A discovery that was considered a great Chochmah in those days.

2

Ramban: It was a group of strong men from the nation Eimim (See Devarim, 2:10) who came to steal his father's donkeys.

3

A heroic feat of strength that made him famous.

QUESTIONS ON RASHI

4)

Rashi writes that "Yemim" are mules, What is the reason?

1.

Rashi: Because, due to their incurable bite, they are terrifying creatures. 1


1

From the word 'Eimah', as the Gemara explains in Chulin, 7b.

5)

Rashi writes that Tziv'on fathered Anah through his own mother. Perhaps Se'ir (Tziv'on's father) fathered him through Tziv'on's wife, and therefore he is called Tziv'on's brother and son!

1.

Mizrachi (2): We must say that Tziv'on transgressed incest with his daughter-in-law or sister-in-law (to explain why Aholivamah is called Bas Tziv'on and Bas Anah 1 ), therefore we attribute a second act of incest to him. We have no source to say that Se'ir ever transgressed.


1

Mizrachi: Chazal could have said that Anah had Bi'ah with Tziv'on's wife, but then they would need to say that another man transgressed to explain why Anah is called the brother and son of Tziv'on. Gur Aryeh

6)

Rashi writes that Tziv'on fathered Anah through his own mother. Perhaps Anah was a proper son of Tziv'on. He is called Se'ir's son, to teach that grandsons are called sons!

1.

Rashbam (Bava Basra 115b): If this teaches that grandsons are called sons, he should not have been written next to Tziv'on, 1

2.

Gur Aryeh: Grandsons are called sons, but not where the Torah comes to teach lineage.


1

Rashash (115b): I.e. rather, he should have been written after all Se'ir's sons. This is difficult. Perhaps he is written next to Tziv'on, for he stood (inherited) in place of him!

7)

Rashi writes that the 'Vav' in "v'Ayah" is superfluous. Why did the Torah add a Vav specifically here?

1.

Ha'Emek Davar: Before Tziv'on fathered Ayah, he adopted his brother Anah and raised him. The Torah lists Ayah as his first first, for he truly was his son; the Vav hints that he was second (Anah was older). Aholivamah is called Bas Tziv'on, because Tziv'on raised her father.

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